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View Full Version : Fiber Cement Shears?


CThomp
07-17-2006, 10:06 AM
I'm doing Hardie board on my house. Is it worth buying electric shears? Will it save that much time.

I'm all about saving time especially during the summer.

David
07-17-2006, 11:07 AM
I thought you could use a miter saw. Coles' post indicates the shears are worth it.

CThomp
07-17-2006, 11:12 AM
Yeah...just replied to it. I saw some Porter-cables for $189. That's not to bad a price.

Pokey
07-17-2006, 11:43 AM
Rumor has it that silica that is in the hardie board is going to be big issue in the next few years as far as health goes. Shears are a good option because a dustmask/resperator is not required. just my 2 cents. Not sure of the speed differences.

Also we have been using a product by the name of maxitile for our fibercement jobs. So far no complaints and it is alot cheaper. ABC supply carries it to match their amcraft siding/soffit colors. Just a thought to save a few bucks.

CThomp
07-17-2006, 12:08 PM
That Maxitile stuff looks good but I don't even think there are in vendors for it in my area. I like the roofing shakes especially.

Cole
07-17-2006, 07:37 PM
Rumor has it that silica that is in the hardie board is going to be big issue in the next few years as far as health goes. Shears are a good option because a dustmask/resperator is not required. just my 2 cents. Not sure of the speed differences.

Exactly, why I am stressing to you about getting shears.

Pokey
07-18-2006, 05:47 AM
ABC SUPPLY is the distrubtor here they have a branch in ft meyers 239 437 4778.

ezadmin
07-18-2006, 06:04 PM
I would also highly recommend the shears.. money well spent.

CThomp
07-20-2006, 12:24 PM
Does ABC Supply sell to the general public or just contractors?

Cole
07-20-2006, 02:09 PM
I think they will sell to the general public.

Or they used too.

Pokey
07-21-2006, 04:32 AM
Here they say that they sell wholesale only, but i know homeowners who have purchased materials there. I guess money talks.

CThomp
07-21-2006, 04:58 AM
I'll have to check them out.

HarmsWay
07-26-2006, 03:57 PM
Anyone know if the shears can be rented?

Also, what's the best tool to use to cut a notch out of a board (as in at the top or bottom of a window)?

CThomp
07-27-2006, 05:08 AM
What kind of a notch? Like circular for a/c lines?

David
07-27-2006, 07:13 AM
No, like a rectangular notch. :)

My guess is drill two holes in the corners, then use a jigsaw to cut out the notch. Or just go straight to the jigsaw.

CThomp
07-27-2006, 07:14 AM
Hey i've seen lots of notches and people have lots of different ideas of what a notch is. ;)

Cole
07-27-2006, 07:59 AM
Anyone know if the shears can be rented?

Also, what's the best tool to use to cut a notch out of a board (as in at the top or bottom of a window)?

I assume he is talking about dormer flashing.

If so then I just use a jigsaw.

HarmsWay
07-27-2006, 09:00 AM
Okay, bad choice of words. How about what is the best way to cut a hole for an electrical box? Cole says jigsaw. I'd assume a medium to fine tooth blade? What about when you need a longish straight rip? For example, I have a 12' board that can be the full width the first 4' and last 4' but the middle 4' has to be cut to 3" width to accomodate bottom of the window.

I've never worked with Hardie boards but will be within the next week. I'm having a tough time visualizing how this stuff gets cut. I've been thinking of it as more concrete than fibre, so it would seem to me that shears would cause the piece to crack ahead of the cut. Clearly that's not the case.

Cole
07-27-2006, 10:05 AM
If you have to rip one, I would buy a hardi-blade and put it in a tablesaw.

Also, if you feel comfortable ripping the piece with a circular saw, u can go that route too.

Edit: Go with a fine/medium tooth blade for the jigsaw.

David
07-27-2006, 10:11 AM
It's more fiberous than cementeous, IMO. Very dense.

Use your jigsaw to make that cut, but be careful handling it. You're likely to snap it into thirds if you don't have a helper for that piece.

A hacksaw will work, too. I've even used a drywall poke saw (whatever you want to call 'em) to cut into hardi soffits.

Cole
07-27-2006, 10:53 AM
Use your jigsaw to make that cut, but be careful handling it. You're likely to snap it into thirds if you don't have a helper for that piece.


That is the key sentence, my friend!

I have had it happen to me.

HarmsWay
07-27-2006, 12:38 PM
All good advice. Thanks. I'll try to find a Hardie blade.

HarmsWay
08-08-2006, 08:59 AM
Finished my first HardiPlank job. I will look harder for shears next time. I bought a Bosch clone of the Hitachi Hardi Blade for my circular saw which worked well enough ($20 cheaper). It creates a lot of dust which was fine the first day because we had a nice breeze blowing it away. Not so much the second day. The cross-cuts would have been better with the shears. For the cut-outs at the top and bottom of the windows and doors we just did plunge cuts with circ saw then finished the corners with a jigsaw. I was amazed how well the jigsaw saw cut and wondered why I was using the circ saw. It was clearer after I realized that the jigsaw teeth were pretty much worn down to nothing after after about 8" of cutting. Also tried a few scribe and snap cuts which worked okay but took too long.

I should add this is definitely a two person job - three if you want a dedicated cutter. We were reasonably careful handling the window cut pieces and didn't break a single piece (well I guess one corner of a board had some cosmetic damage after I fell off the ladder with it).

David
08-08-2006, 10:21 AM
Glad it turned out well. I think there is an OSHA rep on here who can address the falling off the ladder...just kidding!

So would the shears be easier to use than a SCMS?

ezadmin
08-09-2006, 07:09 AM
I know for a fact the shears are easier than a SCMS. One thing to consider with the concrete dust - it's not only bad for your lungs - it's bad for machines, motors, etc. I didn't get the shears on a pretty large hardi job and went through 2 circular saws.. so IMO the next 2 jobs I did I used the shears with no trouble at all. So more than worth it.

David
08-09-2006, 07:54 AM
How much do the shears cost? Any linky?

ezadmin
08-09-2006, 10:44 AM
I bought a pair of Porter Cable shears for around $200
http://www.porter-cable.com/index.asp?e=547&p=2857

bobbyg313
10-15-2006, 06:03 PM
using shears helps alot with dust that stuff is not good to inhale. when riping its a pain to use. just use shears to cut it to lenght and a circular saw with an old blade hardy board will dull a blade, to rip and notch

m.shane
09-09-2010, 02:38 AM
What's a nibbler? I have been searching about this online, all I see id about shears. I'm in a time crunch and need to get something tomorrow. When using my jigsaw I blow through blades like crazy and I'm sick of it!